Fans cannot attend soccer games across the country due to new government restrictions

Spectators will no longer be able to attend football matches in England after the entire country is placed in the two most severe levels of government coronavirus restrictions.

Current guidelines state that clubs located in level two zones are allowed to host 2,000 socially distant fans, while those in level one are allowed to have double.

Before the last review of coronavirus restrictions on Wednesday, Everton and Liverpool were the only Premier League clubs capable of accommodating spectators – but that will now end.

Manchester City v Arsenal FC - Premier League
Series of hygiene measures failed to prevent coronavirus outbreaks in Premier League clubs | Pool / Getty Images

As Health Secretary Matt Hancock has confirmed, all of England will now face severe coronavirus restrictions by being placed at level three or four.

This means that no Premier League, EFL or National League club will be allowed to host spectators. A few non-league teams – which do not meet the “elite” FA parameters – will be allowed to allow a small number of fans in, but it is likely that most of these divisions will close due to restrictions. of travel.

The coronavirus not only prevents spectators from attending matches, it is also wreaking havoc on the match schedule.

Manchester City’s trip to Everton was postponed earlier this week, before Tottenham’s Premier League clash with Fulham was canceled within hours, it was due to start after the Cottagers dismissed a number of COVID- tests. 19 positive among their game staff and behind the scenes. .

A number of Sheffield United players and staff also returned positive tests, although that did not prevent the Blades’ match against Burnley at Turf Moor from continuing. Chris Wilder’s side would lose 1-0, becoming the first top-flight team since 1902 to head into the New Year without a league win under their belt.

The postponements and the rapid spread of the coronavirus in the country have led to speculation that the Premier League will consider a two-week break in the season. This “breaker” was backed by West Brom boss Sam Allardyce, but it remains to be seen whether he will garner enough support – Manchester United boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has already questioned the wisdom of the idea.